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20121201
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and the gulf coast who live with these things regularly. new york state, as you know, suffered nearly $7.3 billion in transportation-related damages due to superstorm sandy. of that total, the new york mta suffered about 5 billion in dages. it's huge. i never saw anything like it. we have the longest underground tunnel in the world in the brooklyn battery tunnel. i take it almost every day i'm in new york city because my home in brooklyn is connected to it. it was totally filled with water. both tubes, from one end to the other, from the manhattan end to the brooklyn end. ere were close to 100 million gallons of water that had to be pumped out of that tunnel and it's still not back up to snuff. that's one of many examples. there's so many. the mta did a very good job. i want to congratulate joe lhota. they moved their rolling stock to high ground. tried to barricade this awful flood in the best way they could. boy, it's awful. the mta is the largest public transportation system in the country. it's the life blood of new york. it's our circulatory system. 3.5 million people g on and off m
. residents gather to find comfort and pray. and national newspapers also digging into the story. the new york times saying -- victims there, white and friends with a background. there is a detail of how teachers helped students three crisis. other articles looking at the alleged killer and the victim's. and another story today -- "the justice department shows ideas about background checks." at after the shooting of gabrielle giffords and others of a supermarket in 2011, the justice department expanded the background checks to reduce the likelihood of guns falling into the hands of the mentally ill and criminals. the election campaign heated up and congress conducted a politically-charged investigation into the operation fast and furious gun trafficking case, according to people familiar with the internal deliberations. looking at some other stories in the news -- the washington post also covers that keeping the justice department had to toughen gun laws ahead of the election. that is the headline. much of the effort was put on hold until after last month's election. according to several offic
from york and new jersey urged congress to approve a supplemental funding for its cities affected by hurricane cindy. two officials with the small business administration testified. this is one hour and 45 minutes. >> good morning. thank you for joining us today to discuss the small business administration's response to hurricane sandy. i've of like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment. i will introduce them in just a moment. let me make a couple of opening statements. we are here today to evaluate the response and recovery effort in the aftermath of hurricane same day as the largest ice storm in u.s. history. hurricane zandi claimed the lives of 130 to americans, it damaging and destroying more than 600,000 homes and 459,000 businesses leaving more than 8.5 million families with out fire or running water. most of the power grid has been turned back on. they're still communities that are challenged. the scale has treated significant challenges. this a require a sustained effort a part of the local officials. voluntary earlier this week i had the chance t
new york served from 1996-1998 and from 2005 until the present. they will all be retiring from congress at the end of the year. the record will remain open for five business days for any member of the committee who wishes to submit a statement or additional questions. if there is nothing further, we are adjourned. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> explore the history and literary culture of albany this week and on c-span2 and c-span3. first, a fema and hud on the ongoing recovery from the storm. the centers from york and new jersey will speak out the storm impacted their states. -- the senators from new york and new jersey bespeak about how the storm impacted their states. this could be triggered in january of next year. our guest is robert levenson. then a roundtable discussion on house we castration -- house sequestration can affect the budget policy. "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern here on c-span. >> we are at the new york state museum. this is our gallery dedicated to the
. the quality of life is certainly different. in new york, where i live, $250,000 is peanuts compared to living in a different state. you could have a huge house. if you are in new york, you will probably get an apartment. i see democrats, especially the president, as unwilling to negotiate with each other. my hope and prayer is that the country comes out strong by january 1 with extended tax breaks. >> here is a quick look at the tax increases, this is from " washington journal." "changes -- this is from "the washington journal." "many of these are expected to revert to clinton era levels." >> starting out the sunday shows, president obama with an interview on "meet the press." and their efforts in congress. here is what he had to say. [video clip] >> i am confident that we will see an agreement in the next 48 hours. if that does not happen, democrats in the senate will put a bill on the floor of the senate and republicans will have to decide whether or not they will block it, meaning that middle-class taxes go up. i do not think that they would want to do that, politically, but they may wind
need, it is based on a median income calculation. and as a result of at, states like new york or california has a lot more poor people and also has a lot of rich people, so it doesn't get the same break. you get over 60% reimbursement from the feds. you get 50, you get -- i think it i you get 60. i can't remember everybody's numbers. i tried to educate myself. whereas new york, we only get 50. makes a big difference. pat moynihan who always tried to change the formulas ended up saying it is all james madison's fault. but i think that there are a couple of ings that are terribly, terribly important and don't contradict anything that you all said, weon't have a very good way of measuring adequacy of our infrastructure. we know that the chinese spend eight times a higher percentage of their gdp in infrastructure as we do in this country, and we know that that's got to make us less competitive. i think i learned from the people at the chamber here that cost of moving goods in the united states is greater in absolute dollars than it is in europer asia. therefore adding to our lack
in the affirmative -- >> mr. speaker, i ask the unions. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york. the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 392 the nays are three. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the -- for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan rise? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to speak out of order for the purpose of making an announcement. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. the
by propublica and the lower east side tenement of new york city. [applause] >> with a degree comes student debt. i'm really happy to be here tonight. it is great to take some time, to have this many and this whole set up to discuss these things, and these issues. i think propublica does a fantastic job with this, as they do with everything. we are happy to have a fantastic panel with the array of experts you would want to be discussing this issue. marion has been covering this for propublica, and a month ago had a fantastic piece that would-be the result of months of investigation of the debt burden on parents. that is an aspect that not a lot of people have been talking about. although you may have read about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and the author of several publications including "student loan lot," and "the guide to surviving student debt." next to her is the n.y.u. ch
americans, haitians, a big lgbt community, big arts community, a lot of internal migrants from new york, where the same way clark county has been -- you've got a pot, a core of white democratic activists that have brought california politics in nevada. ofmiami, you've got a core new york, northeastern democratic activists who brought those politics to south florida. and within that you're now starting to see very effective latino players, a democratic congressman who won a race against a highly flawed republican candidate, but still won, who formed a coalition that, you know, went from miami beach through working class neighborhoods, all the way down to the keys with very distinct different working class whites, gays, you know, snowbirders, and then a big chunk of cuban and non-cuban latinos. so, in the second part of it, you start thinking about identity politics in a different way. if you are thinking of a group that has flexed its muscles by virtue of being part of a coalition, as opposed to having flexed its muscles as being a plaintiff, as having been alone, as being outsiders sayi
because the technology changed. there is a magnetic tape. you have to go to chicago or new york to record. i'm an old-fashioned guy. i still want all those kids to come to a seminar on a campus. i am teaching a course next year and i'm trying to figure how to get my 50-minute chunks -- 15-minute chunks. we have a question there. >> i'm carol thompson. i have a question for each of the three panelists. we have been talking about what we were hoping for the future. what are your greatest fears and greatest hopes for 2016 and 2020? it is a small question. >> i presume you don't think the world will end december 21. >> susan will not say newt gingrich will run again. >> did not come to me first on this one. >> wow, my greatest fear? i hope my kids are well employed. they are doing ok. they are in their 20's. my greatest fear -- i do not think about fears. i'm surrounded by so many incredible kids that i feel good. if i feel bad in the morning, i feel good after my class. >> you stole my thunder. >> i prefer the thunder over the heat. >> a couple of things. i think the fiscal situation is the
. >> just one fast comment. david in new york, we passed a law -- saying the banks lend the legislatures enough money. [laughter] so it never became a problem. my question is as follows. the fed, as you point out, as enormous amounts of financial asset. if they were to let interest rates go up, the decline and the values of those assets have an even more shocking impact on our economy. is that not true? how do we ever give out? if the fed is continuing to buy these financial assets at the rate they're doing now, how do we get out of that mess? and second, i agree to everything you all said. you didn't really disagree about the problem but to me, i would look at the way our politics is advanced. they really have such an amount of leverage on this process and they're the one. s that are not compromising and they're driving in addition to the lack of strong political issues. they're the one who is are driving an extension of the stalemate. >> i'll only answer your first question on the fed. the fed holds short term. they hold some long term. the long term is staggered. right now, there's ab
national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> explores the history and literary culture of all but the, new york this weekend on book tv on c-span 2. next, your calls and comments on "washington journal." eighth joint economic committee hears from analysts on the so- called fiscal cliff -- a economic committee hears from atlas on so-called fiscal cliff. -- analysts on colorado the cliff. >> it was constitutional for them to establish i.t. -- id. >> they talked about indiana. let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i longd is disproportionately affect minorities, -- voter id laws disproportionately affect minorities. if whites voters can it -- get people,u telling black that they are less than? we always have to make special -- there has to be a specialnes when we deals with minorities because they are too feeble mind. when you treat people like the victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> crystal wright tonight at 8 ." c-span's "q & a today, the latest on the
:00have a goo. >> explore the history and literary coulter of a new york's capital city, albany. they all today on c-span, a secretary of defense leon panetta visits the walter reed medical center followed by david coombs, bradley manning's of turning. the hearing on the republic of mali. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3. they're going to say that this president. >> they decided it was constitutional for them to establish i.d.s they did not say all of those states. >> correct. let me finish. you are misrepresenting what i am saying. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws a disproportionately affect us. if white people can go through all the laws, what are you telling back people? they are less than? that is what bothers me about rhetoric. we always have to make special --there has to be a specialist when we deal with minorities. it there too feeble mind it appeared we need to make concessions. they cannot follow the rules. we treat people like victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> defense secretary leon p
are the ambassador, and you have these big stories again "the new york times" and also bloomberg that talk about the .ealth of xi jinping's family what happens when a story like that breaks, and is there any way the u.s. government had a hand in it? >> often times, they do think the u.s. government has a hand in these stories, and we always indicate that our press is free and come up with stories that even we do not like, but we have a basic philosophy of the freedom of the press, and we are not going to put pressure on any news organization from writing stories to disseminating opinions and conducting the investigative journalism. >> did it create any kind of ripple throughout the country? >> it did not create a ripple throughout china because it was censored. the "new york times" articles were not available. no references on >> at a time where we know that there is a growing quality in china, there must be some sense throughout china that the leaders are enriching themselves. >> the way it has worked until of least present day, and the reason that these articles about ewalth wealth --la wealfa
union and two articles from the ap and the new york times. if i could enter those things into the record, i would appreciate it. i wanted to get your perspectives on this. in your recent report you cite research showing 40% of credit disputes are related to collections, events. before we jump into that piece of it, over all, this issue of the complexity of medical that and resolving it, whether it is a good predictor or whether it should be part of the credit reporting system. >> i appreciate your bringing this issue up. it is definitely a source of concern. the fact that collections items are disputed at high rates is not a surprise. -information's its disputed more often than positive information. we should expect higher rates on collective items. i think you have pointed out in some of your own correspondence over half of collections items about 10 years ago a denture a fed study come from -- in a fed study comes from medical collections items, which is way out of proportion to the role the health-care system plays a in the economy compared to debt. >> is that the federal reserve stud
problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have been able to meet two of the people i have dreamed about going down to that 18th hole. with a good put, i can win this thing. this is a personal privilege for me to be able to meet the great jack nicklaus and to be here to help honor the great arnold palmer. we know that arnold palmer has played on the finest courses that the world has. he has designed 300 golf courses. seven of them are in nevada, operating now. he has won trophy after trophy after trophy. he has been swinging golf clubs since a little boy of four years old. he was always such a big star. i hope, arnold, you'll remember. you and winnie were traveling across the country. they stopped a long way from las vegas to have a hamburger and some f
in which they were forged. recently, a columnist at "the new york times" summarized this well when he said that there were policies that are not permanently right and that situations differ. tax cuts might be right one decade but wrong the next. tighter regulations might be right one decade but is corrosive steps in, the regulation may be in order. madam president, as we confront the confluence of issues known as the fiscal cliff, we are at a moment of major significance and requires the application of principles that brooks describes. for the sake of the country, we must demonstrate to the american people that we are capable of making the big decisions by putting in place an agreement and a framework to avoid the fiscal cliff before we adjourn this year. madam president, we are surrounded by history perpetually here in the senate as well as throughout the capital. how could we not be inspired by its rise to this occasion? indeed, if you know history you understand very story of america's most formative days were defined by an understanding that effective governance required the building o
. more polarization and more instability. >> okay, shadi, there was an article in the new york times -- i think it was on friday -- in which unnamed u.s. officials were suggesting that morsi might have learned from the last couple of weeks that winner take all is not the way to go and that he needs to reach out to his political opponents. do you think that the brotherhood understands this referendum as in part a referendum on the way it's running politics in egypt? >> to some extent yes, but i think there's a bigger problem here. the brotherhood is in full existential mode. they're extremely paranoid. they believe that opposition is out to destroy them. they think liberals are anti- democratic and are out to bring down who they view to be elected and legitimately elected president. so they're very much in that mode of thinking. and that's why essentially one of their justifications for the authoritarian november 22 decree is -- and brotherhood leaders actually told me this -- is yes, we know it looks bad, we know it's kind of anti- democratic, but the normal rules of politics are suspende
colleagues, especially my friend from new york, caroline mccarthy, who has poured her heart and soul working every day on this issue and to our leader nancy pelosi and all of my colleagues. president obama and the american people are demanding change and we can bring that change by passing this friday a ban on the massacre assault magazines. we can pass it. believe me, if guns made anyone safer, we would be the safest nation on earth. we have more guns per capita than any country on earth. and after the unfathomable tragedy, our country is united and determined in a demand for change. without change in our gun policy, we cannot expect the outcome to be any different from what we are already experiencing and we have already had too many mass murders and the cost is unbearable. these were elementary schoolchildren. and their teachers. but there have been movie goers. americans going to town hall meetings. there are some who say any gun restriction is an imposition on their liberty. but they must understand that the level of gun violence in america today is an imposition on the liberty of all a
, in alaska, offshore, it is coast, west coast, gulf coast, in new york, pennsylvania, in the eagle ford areas. that has enormous implications in terms of gdp growth. because of the enormity of the issue, you have to continue to reduce demand. >> what role should the government play in the future -- your business is in transportation, too -- we are mired in conversations about the fiscal cliff. we are talking about long-term infrastructure, a long term energy plan. >> this is the perfect opportunity for the government to work together to achieve a common goal. there is plenty of times when our interest might not call last with the interest of either of the parties. this is the opportunity we have never had before. you could have consumer, business, and the government's all working together to take advantage of this huge resource. for us, it makes so much sense because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 a quilt when natural gas. from the government point of view, everybody is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. everyone talks about taxes and what is going to happen with the fiscal
. secretary of state hillary clinton was admitted to a new york hospital on sunday. according to the state department, doctors discovered a blood clot stemming from the concussion he sustained several weeks ago. she is being treated with an anticoagulant and doctors will continue to monitor her condition to see which ferc -- whether for the treatment is needed. coming up on c-span, members of congress talk about negotiations surrounding the fiscal cliff. senate majority leader harry reid, speeches on the senate floor from california democrat barbara boxer, west virginia senator joe mansion, texas republican kay bailey hutchison and then caucus leaders speak to reporters. r is recognized. mr. reid: thank you very much, mr. president. i was really gratified to hear the republicans have taken their demand for social security benefit cuts off the table. the truth ishey should never have been on the table to begin with. there is still significant distance between the two sides, but negotiations continue. there is still time left to reach an agreement, and we intend to continue negotiations. i a
about the coordination between the state department and department of defense? there is a "new york times" story that points out the the pentagon had no forces that could be readily sent at the time of the attack. the marine expeditionary unit available to the african demand -- no marine expeditionary unit available to the african demand. given the potential for unrest, it seems to me that that is a question that is critical as we continue to provide protection for our personnel on the ground. >> first with regard to the specific issue of benghazi, i want to address this. there was simply not enough time to have used military force to respond and make a difference in that situation. you raised a very good broader question and something we will be working through with our colleagues in the pentagon. >> mr. chairman, given the potential for unrest across the middle east, i would hope that we would follow up on this specific question. it seems to me to be critical as we look at the situation going forward. i will just conclude by adding my personal thanks and appreciation to senator lu
hear a region in a few minutes, a segment from new york to boston. around 68 miles per hour average. i started to talk about the horrible history highlights of amtrak's attempts. they did require have a train some years ago. very expensive lawsuits went on and on. they required a european design. you have things that could enhance the speech. amtrak redesigned them to be wider and may be calculated because when the train got to higher speeds and tilted, they would hit. they had put madden -- metal shin's into the tilt trains they bought so they would not killed. -- tilt. the failure went on and on. wheat closed down most of the operations because they did not have brake parts. they bought equipment for which they did not have parts. another sad chapter. they will tell you they do make money but they do not tell you most of the capital we provide and the congress. that is part of the problem we face. we have got friends from labor here. i like -- we passed almost every major piece of legislation. we passed the transportation bill they said could not be passed. we passed our coast guard
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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